FAQ About CBD

CBD Information You Need to Know

1) Is Hemp the same as Marijuana?

Hemp and marijuana are two types of cannabis that are genetically distinct and differ in both cultivation, chemical properties, and use. Hemp is grown and cultivated for fiber and seed to produce a variety of products including foods, oils, rope, and fabrics. Marijuana is cultivated to yield high levels of the psychoactive ingredient THC, concentrated heavily in the flowers and buds. Marijuana is bred to have THC levels that can exceed 20% as opposed to hemp can have NO THC and no psychoactive properties.

2) What is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the many different compounds, known as cannabinoids, found in the cannabis plant. Cannabinoids are unique because they act on cannabinoid receptors that are part of the endocannabinoid system found throughout the body. The second most abundant compound in cannabis, CBD is not intoxicating and has none of the psychoactive properties of marijuana.

3) How is CBD made?

Nearly pure CBD is isolated from the other cannabinoids found in hemp oil. Hemp oil is extracted from the stalks and stems of cannabis using a chemical process and contains the full range of cannabinoids found in the plant. Oil may be obtained using solvents or with a non-toxic and non-flammable CO2 extraction method. Prevalent in the food industry, and “generally regarded as safe” by the FDA, CO2 extraction eliminates the risk of solvent residues in the final product.

4) Will I get High?

CBD does not have any of the psychoactive properties associated with marijuana and will not impair the user or get them “high.” Industrial hemp can have 0% THC content can yield high-quality CBD that is 99% pure.

5) Is CBD legal?

CBD companies are unable to give legal advice on the legality of CBD. This information is a third party interpretation in an effort to encourage consumers to do their research on the legality of CBD. CBD is legal in 44 states. In 28 states where medical marijuana is legal, CBD products are covered by those same medical marijuana legal protections. In recent years, 16 states have passed CBD-only laws, which legalize the possession and use of CBD products for specific conditions – but not cannabis products containing higher levels of THC. Those CBD-only laws often limit the legal possession and use of CBD products to children with epilepsy, and some nerve and muscle afflictions. Even in those states with CBD legal protections, however, the substance is considered federally illegal by the DEA. Only six states—Idaho, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Indiana, and West Virginia still consider every part of the cannabis plant, including CBD, to be illegal. The Controlled Substance Act does not contain the terms “Cannabidiol,” “Cannabinoids” or “Hemp.” In order for these terms to be included in the CSA and officially become law, it would take an act of Congress, passed by the House and Senate, and signed by the President. Companies who source domestic hemp products, cultivated in full compliance with the Farm Bill, under appropriate licensing from respective state departments of agriculture in Colorado and Kentucky are covered under this legislation. Furthermore, according to the continuing Appropriations Acts of 2016 and 2017, it is the expressed intent of Congress that hemp cultivated in compliance with the Farm Bill be intended for “transportation, processing, and sale.”

6) Will I pass a drug test?

Many CBD products have no THC in them at all, and all CBD products derived from industrial hemp. Many factors determine whether a person can pass a drug test, making them unpredictable.

7) How is it Taken?

CBD can be taken orally by placing it under the tongue, allowing it to dissolve and be absorbed, or ingested in capsules and edibles. CBD can also be added to ointments and lotions for topical use or inhaled using a vaporizer. The method of ingestion plays a significant role in how quickly CBD enters the system, with vaporizing being quickest and most efficient.

7) What is the difference between Isolate and Full Spectrum?

Products that are Full Spectrum contain CBD as well as other cannabinoids, while CBD Isolate is 99% pure isolated CBD. Cannabinoids affect every individual differently and determining which product is most effective depends on personal needs and preferences.

8) Does CBD produce side effects?

Hemp and CBD are both considered safe and should not produce any adverse side effects in most people. However, everyone processes CBD and other dietary supplements differently, and it is always recommended to consult with a physician before adding any supplement to your diet.

9) Are CBD products safe?

CBD and the processes used by reputable companies enable the manufacture of a variety of safe CBD products. The CBDistillery ensures that its products are of the highest quality by consistently testing and using only non-GMO industrial hemp. All products manufactured by The CBDistillery are from hemp grown outdoors under natural sunlight with pesticide-free organic practices.

 

 

Information from site

https://www.thecbdistillery.com/cbd-information-10-faqs-cbd-hemp/

 

Hemp Oil Tincture FAQ’s

How do I use the hemp oil tincture, how many times per day and why would I benefit using it?  

 Our hemp oil tincture is primarily ingested sublingually (under the tongue) for improved absorption. Based on research, the recommended usage is 1, 15-25mg serving, daily and consistently. Our tincture is 41.67mg per 1 ml and we recommend dispensing the tincture under the tongue and holding it there for at least 30-90 seconds to improve the bioavailability of the product (best absorption). Most of our customers start with their use in the morning and some use right before they go to bed, depending on the reason for use. Everyone is different, and we suggest following these guidelines until you discover what works best for you. 

 

Are your products organically grown, and are they processed and lab tested?

Our products are organically grown, processed and tested for any molds, pesticides, herbicides, and solvents.

Phytocannabinoids?  What are those?

Phytocannabinoids are cannabinoids that occur naturally in the cannabis plant or any plant-derived natural product capable of either directly interacting with cannabinoid receptors or sharing chemical similarity with cannabinoids or both.  

 

What are Terpenes?

 

Terpenes

Consider the role of terpenes, for example. Terpenes are volatile aromatic molecules that evaporate easily and readily announce themselves to the nose. Various researchers have emphasized the pharmacological importance of terpenes, or terpenoids, which form the basis of aromatherapy, a popular holistic healing modality. Marijuana’s compelling fragrance and particular psychoactive flavor are determined by the predominate terpenes in a strain.

Around 200 terpenes have been found in cannabis, but only a few of these odiferous oily substances appear in amounts substantial enough to be noteworthy, or nose worthy, as it were. Among them are monoterpenes, diterpenes, and sesquiterpenes, which are characterized by the number of repeating units of a 5-carbon molecule called isoprene, the structural hallmark of all terpenoid compounds. The terpenes in marijuana have given the plant an enduring, evolutionary advantage. Pungent terpenoid oils repel insects and animal grazers; others prevent fungus.

Terpenes, it turns out, are healthy for people as well as plants. A September 2011 report by Dr. Ethan Russo in the British Journal of Pharmacologydiscussed the wide-ranging therapeutic attributes of terpenoids, which are typically lacking in “CBD-only” products.

Beta-caryophyllene, for example, is a sesquiterpene found in the essential oil of black pepper, oregano, and other edible herbs, as well as in various cannabis strains and in many green, leafy vegetables. It is gastro-protective, good for treating certain ulcers, and offers great promise as a therapeutic compound for inflammatory conditions and auto-immune disorders because it binds directly to the peripheral cannabinoid receptor known as “CB2.”

In 2008, the Swiss scientist Jürg Gertsch documented beta-caryophyllene’s binding affinity for the CB2receptor and described it as “a dietary cannabinoid.” It is the only terpenoid known to directly activate a cannabinoid receptor. And it’s one of the reasons why green, leafy vegetables are so healthy to eat.

Terpenoids and cannabinoids both increase blood flow, enhance cortical activity, and kill respiratory pathogens, including MRSA, the antibiotic-resistant bacteria that in recent years has claimed the lives of tens of thousands of Americans. Dr. Russo’s article reports that cannabinoid-terpenoid interactions “could produce synergy with respect to treatment of pain, inflammation, depression, anxiety, addiction, epilepsy, cancer, fungal and bacterial infections.”

Marijuana’s bouquet of terpenes—that “riot of perfumes,” as the poet (and hashish-eater) Arthur Rimbaud once said—plays another important role. Terpenes and CBD buffer THC’s tricky psychoactivity. Cannabinoid-terpenoid interactions amplify the beneficial effects of cannabis while mitigating THC-induced anxiety.

The terpenoid profile can vary considerably from strain to strain. Patients who abandon a suitable strain for one with higher THC and/or CBD content may not get more relief if the terpenoid profile is significantly different.

 

 

What is the CBD Entourage Effect?

A large part of alternative medicine revolves around using the entire plant for medicinal purposes rather than isolating or producing the active ingredient in a laboratory.

Herbalists excel at matching holistic, plant-based treatments to a variety of ailments, which, in practice, is known as whole-plant medicine. Whole-plant medicine has been in use for thousands of years in ancient healing arts such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

We live in a world of pills and quick fixes; and this alternative and holistic approach may seem old-fashioned, but there is change in the air and the isolated chemicals so many of us are consuming may be quickly going out of style.

Mounting evidence suggests that medical substances may be more effective in their whole and natural state.

This phenomenon, called the entourage effect, results when the many components within the cannabis plant interact with the human body to produce a stronger influence than any one of those components alone – it’s a synergistic effect.

To understand the concept, think of it in terms of human interactions. We all have gifts and abilities that can carry us to a certain point in life. Sometimes, we’ll meet another person who has different gifts and abilities. When partnerships are formed between two people, and abilities are combined, achievements can be made that were otherwise unimaginable.

When we combine multiple compounds in their natural state, we don’t end up with the sum of each part; instead, we get a multiplying effect. The different compounds can amplify each other’s chemistry, making the overall plant more effective in addressing unwanted symptoms.

The entourage effect becomes especially evident when comparing the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant) with the effects of using the whole plant.

When pure, synthetic THC became available (as the drug Marinol) in the mid-1980s, scientists expected it to work just as well as using the entire cannabis plant. However, they quickly discovered that patients preferred to use the whole plant instead of Marinol.

As it turns out, cannabis contains more active compounds than just THC. Over 85 cannabinoids have been found to work in conjunction with THC to produce the relief that is often reported by cannabis users.  

In particular, the compound known as Cannabidiol (CBD) modulates the effect of THC on the human body.

Scientific and clinical experimentation has revealed that a cannabis plant which contains far more THC than CBD makes the user feel intoxicated or “high.” Hemp, which contains the inverse ratio (more CBD than THC) can relieve symptoms without the psychoactive effect of marijuana.

However, specially bred cannabis that contains roughly equal amounts of THC and CBD were shown to be the most effective in terms of symptom relief and pain. These findings indicate that the ratio of THC to CBD plays a crucial role in determining the efficacy of the cannabis plant for therapeutic applications.

If using the entire plant (or plant extract) is so much more useful than lab-produced drugs, why don’t we use the whole plant more often?

Well, there are several obstacles to overcome before the holistic approach can become feasible on a widespread scale in the U.S. These obstacles include:

  1. Quality control is poor, resulting in potentially contaminated, adulterated, less effective, or even unsafe herbal products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not strictly monitor herbal medicine products as it does for medical products.
  2. The potency of botanical extracts is inconsistent, as the environment and weather conditions affect each year’s crop of plants.
  3. Botanical products do not undergo standardization due to insufficient knowledge and understanding of all the components that contribute to the therapeutic effect.

In the next several years, ongoing research should shed more light on whole-plant medicine, giving us increased insight into plants like cannabis, how they interact with the human body, and how these plants can be harnessed for medicinal purposes.